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Updates and corrections from paper edits

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Kenneth John Odle 2 weeks ago
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  1. 34
      linux-dictionary.tex

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linux-dictionary.tex

@ -36,7 +36,7 @@
% paragraph spacing in all paragraphs
\usepackage{parskip}
\setlength{\parskip}{2pt}
\setlength{\parskip}{0pt}
% Use tab stops when we need to (especially in footnotes)
\usepackage{tabto}
@ -76,6 +76,12 @@
\tableofcontents
\medskip
\begin{small}
Pages 1-40 are in volume 1. Pages 41-80 are in volume 2.
\end{small}
\bigskip
\hrule
@ -84,17 +90,15 @@
\section{The Introduction}
\end{center}
{\parskip=0pt %Remove parskip
\begin{multicols}{2}
\begin{small}
What follows is a dictionary of various terms related to Linux. It currently resides at\\ \texttt{https://git.kjodle.net/kjodle/linux-dictionary}. Go there to buy a paper copy of this book.
What follows is a dictionary of various terms related to Linux. It currently resides online at \texttt{https://git.kjodle.net/kjodle/linux-dictionary}. Go there to buy a paper copy of this book.
\tabto{0.3cm} \textbf{Note:} A lot of these terms also relate to Unix, upon which Linux is based, and may have little meaning or a different meaning in a Linux context. \textit{Caveat emptor!}
\tabto{0.3cm} \textbf{n.b.:} Some of these terms may also refer to Mac OSX or Windows. \textit{Intense shuddering intensifies.}
\tabto{0.3cm} \textbf{n.b.:} Some of these terms may also refer to Mac OSX or Windows. \textit{Intense shuddering intensifies.} I have tried to keep these references to a minimum.
\tabto{0.3cm} I make no warranty, express or implied, regarding the accuracy, completeness, or currency of any of these terms. Most of the software described herein is in a fairly heavy state of development and things change. Sometimes they change quickly, sometimes they evolve slowly over time, but the salient point is that they change. Sources sometimes confirm one another and sometimes contradict one another because they may be looking at information which was published in different years. The moving hand writes, and having written, moves on.
@ -112,16 +116,12 @@ What follows is a dictionary of various terms related to Linux. It currently res
\end{multicols}
} % End removal of parskip
\hrule
\begin{center}
\section{The Abbreviations}
\end{center}
{\parskip=0pt %Remove parskip
\begin{multicols}{2}
\begin{small}
@ -138,7 +138,7 @@ Standard Latin definitions are used extensively throughout this document.
\tabto{0.3cm} \textit{q.v.} -- This is an abbreviation of the Latin phrase \textit{quod vide}, which translates as ``which see'' which denotes a cross reference to another item. Essentially, it means ``see also (this other thing).''
\tabto{0.3cm} \textit{qq.v.} -- Similar to \textit{q.v.} (but an abbreviation of the Latin phrase \textit{quae vide}, this denotes a cross reference to two or more other items. Essentially, it means ``see also (these other things).''
\tabto{0.3cm} \textit{qq.v.} -- Similar to \textit{q.v.} (but an abbreviation of the Latin phrase \textit{quae vide}), this denotes a cross reference to two or more other items. Essentially, it means ``see also (these other things).''
\medskip
@ -154,8 +154,6 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\end{multicols}
} % End removal of parskip
\hrule
\begin{center}
@ -164,6 +162,8 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\bigskip
{\parskip=2pt %Add parskip
\begin{multicols}{2}
%\begin{small}
@ -251,6 +251,8 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{find} --
\textbf{flabor} --
\textbf{fsck} --
\medskip
@ -314,7 +316,7 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{ls} --
\textbf{man} -- A command-line utility to display the ``man'' (i.e., manual) page for a particular command. It has many parameters. Try \texttt{man man} to start. \\ \tabto{0.3cm}A lot of people don't find the \texttt{man} command very helpful, as it generally contains no examples. If you are in this camp, \textit{q.v.} both the ``tldr'' and ``info'' entries.
\textbf{man} -- A command-line utility to display the ``man'' (i.e., manual) page for a particular command. It has many parameters. Some people jest that \texttt{man} is the only command you really need to know. Try \texttt{man man} to start. The actual files that \texttt{man} reads from are generally stored in \texttt{/usr/share/man}. \\ \tabto{0.3cm}A lot of people don't find the \texttt{man} command very helpful, as it generally contains no examples. If you are in this camp, \textit{qq.v.} ``tldr'' and ``info.''
\textbf{media} --
@ -398,6 +400,8 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{troff} --
\textbf{Tux} --
\textbf{Ubuntu} --
\textbf{uname} --
@ -426,6 +430,8 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{window manager} -- A layer of software that works with the X Window System (\textit{q.v.}) and provides windows management. KDE uses KWin and GNOME uses Metacity.
\textbf{working directory} --
\textbf{X}, \textbf{X-11}, \textbf{X-Windows} -- A windowing system for bitmap displays which is common on Unix-like operating systems. It handles the low-level tasks for the graphical interface.
\textbf{xdvi} -- An application for viewing dvi files.
@ -444,6 +450,8 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\end{multicols}
} % End parskip
\hrule
\begin{center}

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