Browse Source

Added «cowsay» and «fortune»

main
Kenneth John Odle 10 months ago
parent
commit
af86ee1978
  1. 33
      linux-dictionary.tex

33
linux-dictionary.tex

@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
\documentclass[8pt,letterpaper,twoside]{extreport}
\documentclass[9pt,letterpaper,twoside]{extreport}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[english]{babel}
\usepackage{amsmath}
@ -232,7 +232,32 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\item[console]
\item[cowsay]
\item[cowsay] A command line utility that produces an ASCII picture of a cow saying whatever text you input on \texttt{stdin}. The package includes a few variations (called, naturally ``cow files'') which are typically located at \texttt{/usr/share/cowsay}; you can view these by using the \texttt{-l} flag, and use one with the \texttt{-f} flag. Typical output looks like:
\begin{verbatim}
______________
< Linux rocks! >
--------------
\ ^__^
\ (oo)\_______
(__)\ )\/\
||----w |
|| ||
\end{verbatim}
You can also pipe the \texttt{fortune} utility to it:
\begin{verbatim}
-----------------------------------
/ You teach best what you most need \
\ to learn. /
-----------------------------------
\ ^__^
\ (oo)\_______
(__)\ )\/\
||----w |
|| ||
\end{verbatim}
\item[cp]
@ -274,6 +299,8 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\item[flabor]
\item[fortune] A utility that sends a fortune to \texttt{stdout}. It has a surprising number of options for such a simple utility. (The \texttt{-o} option will select potentially offensive fortunes. This option is not selected by default; use at your own peril.)
\item[fsck] A utility (\textbf{f}ile \textbf{s}ystem che\textbf{ck}) for checking the consistency of a file system. (The Windows equivalent is \texttt{chkdsk}.) fsck runs automatically on every 30th boot of Ubuntu.
\medskip
@ -396,7 +423,7 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\item[Qt] (Pronounced ``cute''.)
\item[rm] A command line utility for removing files, links, and empty directories. It works silently, and thus should be used with care. The \textbf{-t} (interactive) option prompts the user to confirm each file that is being deleted. It can remove directories that contain files with the recursive option (\texttt{-r} or \texttt{-R}), but as it works silently and any deleted files cannot be recovered, it is always a good practice to combine these two options.
\item[rm] A command line utility for removing files, links, and empty directories. It works silently, and thus should be used with care. The \textbf{-t} (interactive) option prompts the user to confirm each file that is being deleted. It can remove directories that contain files with the recursive option (\texttt{-r} or \texttt{-R}), but as it works silently and any deleted files cannot be recovered, it is always a good practice to combine these two options. You can specify multiple files (including the directory path if the target file is not in the current directory) and use wildcards like \texttt{?} and \texttt{*}.
\item[rpm]

Loading…
Cancel
Save