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Kenneth John Odle 2 weeks ago
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      linux-dictionary.tex

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linux-dictionary.tex

@ -108,7 +108,7 @@ What follows is a dictionary of various terms related to Linux. It currently res
\tabto{0.3cm} Likewise, when I point out that a lot of people like a particular item, or that a lot of people dislike a particular item, I am not suggesting that you should be in the same camp, or that I consider either option valid. I am merely reporting what has come up in my research. As much as is humanly possible, I have tried to exclude my own opinion from these pages. My experience is neither broad enough nor deep enough as to inform other's opinions on a wide range of Linux-related topics. When I say that people like or don't like something, I try to include the most often cited reason(s), and in the case where they don't like something, I also try to include the most popular alternatives, if there are any.
\tabto{0.3cm} With regard to alphabetizing, I do not include the leading dot that indicates a file name (so \texttt{.deb} is in the `d' section), nor do I include an asterisk used as a wildcard (meaning that \texttt{*nix} is alphabetized with other terms that start with `n').
\tabto{0.3cm} With regard to alphabetizing, I do not include the leading dot that indicates a file name (so \texttt{.deb} is in the `d' section), nor do I include an asterisk used as a wildcard (meaning that \texttt{*nix} is alphabetized with other terms that start with `n'). Information about . (dot) and .. (dot dot) is found in the `d' section as well.
\tabto{0.3cm} I created this document in \LaTeX{}, which is an ideal situation for a document like this, because it makes it easy to keep things uniform. It does introduce other issues, however. To see what they were and how I handled them, please consult the source code, listed at the beginning of this introduction. Again, if you have suggestions as to how to do it better, contact info is inside the back cover.
@ -181,7 +181,7 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{ALSA} --
\textbf{apt} -- The Advanced Packaging Tool. It is the front end for the Debian package management system. It performs a large number of functions, including downloading of packages, resolving dependencies, and installation of Debian packages (which have a .deb file extention).
\textbf{apt} -- A command (\textbf{a}dvanced \textbf{p}ackaging \textbf{t}ool) for installing new software. It is the front end for the Debian package management system, performing a large number of functions, including downloading of packages, resolving dependencies, and installation of Debian packages (which have a \texttt{.deb} file extension).
\textbf{apt-get} --
@ -235,7 +235,11 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{diff} --
\textbf{distro} -- Short for ``distribution,'' this refers to a specific version of Linux that is customized with its own software, options, and look and feel. These include things like \textbf{Ubuntu}, \textbf{Debian}, and \textbf{Fedora}. \textit{c.f.} \textbf{flavor}.
\textbf{distro} -- Short for ``distribution,'' this refers to a specific version of Linux that is customized with its own software, options, and look and feel. These include things like Ubuntu, Debian, and Fedora. \textit{c.f.} flavor.
\textbf{. (dot)} --
\textbf{.. (dot dot)} --
\textbf{dpkg} --
@ -255,15 +259,17 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{flabor} --
\textbf{fsck} --
\textbf{fsck} -- A utility (\textbf{f}ile \textbf{s}ystem che\textbf{ck}) for checking the consistency of a file system. (The Windows equivalent is \texttt{chkdsk}.) fsck runs automatically on every 30th boot of Ubuntu.
\medskip
\hrule
\medskip
\begin{centering}
\subsection{Ghost Script - mv}
\subsection{gedit - mv}
\end{centering}
\textbf{gedit} -- GNOME's standard GUI text editor.
\textbf{Ghost Script} --
\textbf{git} --
@ -292,9 +298,13 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{init} --
\textbf{JED} -- A powerful but easy to use text editor available for both GNU Linux and other operating systems.
\textbf{jobs} --
\textbf{KDE} -- A graphical environment used by the openSuse Linux distro as well as others.
\textbf{KDE} -- A desktop environment used by the openSuse and Kubuntu Linux distros as well as others.
\textbf{KDM} -- The \textbf{K}DE \textbf{D}isplay \textbf{M}anager, which is the standard display manager for the KDE desktop. It provides the initial login screen, and also manages the starting and stopping of X (\textit{q.v.}) server sessions.
\textbf{kdvi} -- A KDE application, similiar to xdvi (\textit{q.v.}) for viewing dvi files.
@ -341,7 +351,7 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{pandoc} --
\textbf{pdftk} --
\textbf{pdftk} -- A command line utility for manipulating pdf files. PDF Chain is a GUI wrapper for pdftk.
\textbf{ping} --
@ -371,7 +381,9 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{srv} --
\textbf{sudo} -- An acronym for \textbf{s}uper\textbf{u}ser \textbf{do}. It provides a fairly (YMMV, however) environment for non-root users to access files, directories, and settings, without native root permission.
\textbf{sudo} -- An acronym for \textbf{s}uper\textbf{u}ser \textbf{do}. It provides a fairly safe environment (YMMV, however) for non-root users to access files, directories, and settings, without native root permission. It is required to execute some commands.
\textbf{sudoer} -- A user with \texttt{sudo} permission rights.
\textbf{sys} --
@ -412,9 +424,9 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{unix principle} --
\textbf{unzip} --
\textbf{unzip} -- A command for decompressing \texttt{.zip} archives.
\textbf{update} -- To change software or parts of software to newer versions, in order to add new features, eliminate bugs, or enhance security, or for a combination of those three reasons. In Ubuntu, the \textbf{apt} application handles updates.
\textbf{update} -- To change software or parts of software to newer versions, in order to add new features, eliminate bugs, or enhance security, or for a combination of those three reasons. In Ubuntu, the apt (\textit{q.v.}) application handles updates.
\textbf{useradd} --
@ -428,7 +440,9 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{VIM} -- Acronym for ``VI Improved.''
\textbf{wget} --
\textbf{wget} --
\textbf{which} -- A command which shows where an app is installed. The default usage is \texttt{which <appname>}.
\textbf{window manager} -- A layer of software that works with the X Window System (\textit{q.v.}) and provides windows management. KDE uses KWin and GNOME uses Metacity.
@ -444,7 +458,7 @@ Additional modern abbreviations used include:
\textbf{Xubuntu} -- A distro derived from Ubuntu that uses the Xfce desktop (\textit{q.v.}).
\textbf{zip} --
\textbf{zip} -- A command for compressing one or more files into an archive using the zip compression algorithm.
\end{hangparas}

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