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Numerous corrections; added badges

tags/Issue-002
Kenneth John Odle 1 year ago
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002/codex-002.tex

@ -69,7 +69,10 @@
% See also https://www.overleaf.com/learn/latex/Typesetting_quotations
% Make things neater. Thanks /u/-LeopardShark-
%\usepackage{microtype}
\usepackage{microtype}
% Put a horizontal rule in an align environment
\usepackage{booktabs}
\author{Kenneth John Odle}
\title{
@ -79,7 +82,7 @@
Typeset in \LaTeX{} \\
Issue \#002}
}
\date{\begin{small}2021.10.01\end{small}}
\date{\begin{small}2021.11.14\end{small}}
\begin{document}
\maketitle
@ -95,6 +98,8 @@ I'm pushing this to my own git server as I write this. You can find it \href{htt
You can just skip over all the diversions in here if you want. It's just how my mind works. (And yes, there will be politics in this. \textit{You have been warned.}) Also, I use a lot of em-dashes, parentheses, and footnotes because that is also how my mind works. It's just one big long stream of consciousness up in here most days.
The buttons are from the Button Optimizer website, which is here: \href{https://buttonoptimizer.com/}{\texttt{https://buttonoptimizer.com/}}. I'm not sure if I like this concept or not. We'll have to see.
\tableofcontents
\chapter{The Later Salad Days}
@ -120,12 +125,12 @@ Second, you then have to trim the bound edges, so that the pages are separate. P
After that, separate your pages into groups of equal numbers of pages that you will scan. This should be however many sheets your scanner can handle easily at one time, and will depend largely on the kind of paper the book was printed on. I generally find ten sheets (i.e., 20 pages) work well, and make it easier for me to count. Smaller groups means more work up front, but it also means that it is easier to fix things when (not \textit{if}) something goes wrong.
Number all of your groups with the filename they will eventually have. I use a pencil and mark this lightly (or not so lightly, depending on the day) in the lower right corner of the first page:
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[scale=0.5]{number_your_sections}
\end{center}
Number all of your groups with the filename they will eventually have. I use a pencil and mark this lightly (or not so lightly, depending on the day) in the lower right corner of the first page:
This is all about workflow for me. Since my scanner (a Brother MFC-J8050DW) scans whatever is facing \textit{down} in the document feeder, after I scan the first (i.e., odd-numbered) side, I should see odd numbers facing up in the ADF. I then know that I need to scan the side that is now facing down, which means that I don't turn them over, I just rotate them 180\textdegree{} in the \textit{xy}-plane.
Most books have unnumbered pages. This should go without saying, but it's one of those things that you don't think about until after it becomes an issue: \textit{number all the blank pages}. Again, I just use a pencil:
@ -148,6 +153,18 @@ You will end up with two sheets (i.e., four pages) that are a different size, an
\includegraphics[scale=0.5]{cheat_sheet}
\end{center}
You can do this math as a check on the final project.
\begin{align*}
001-015 &= 15 \times 20 & 300 \mbox{ pages} \\
016 &= 1 \times 4 & 4 \mbox{ pages} \\
016-024 &= 8 \times 20 & 160 \mbox{ pages} \\
025 &= 1 \times 12 & 12 \mbox{ pages} \\
\midrule
\mbox{Total} & & 476 \mbox{ pages}
\end{align*}
When you are done scanning and combining files, when you open that final \texttt{file.pdf}, you should be on page 1 of 476 pages.
Now we are \textit{finally} ready to start scanning.
\section{What Does This Have to do With Linux?}
@ -166,16 +183,20 @@ Of course, if you are thinking about outcomes, chances are you don't eat fast fo
For what it's worth, there is a GUI for \texttt{pdftk}. It's called PDF Chain and you can find it at \href{https://pdfchain.sourceforge.io/}{\texttt{https://pdfchain.sourceforge.io/}}.
Despite all my prattling on about the many advantages the command line has for your brain, I'm not opposed to using a GUI, actually. (I mean, I have Ubuntu installed on two machines and Kubuntu on a third.) A GUI does make life easier in many ways, and what I like about one in a case like this is that if you're someone who has to manipulate pdf files rarely or only once, it's probably easier to just use a GUI than it is to learn the command line. Efficiency plays a role here, as well. If I'm going to use this all the time, it's definitely more efficient for me to learn the command line approach. But once or twice a year? Or only once ever? A GUI is much more efficient.
Despite all my prattling on about the many advantages the command line has for your brain, I'm not opposed to using a GUI, actually. (I mean, I have Ubuntu installed on two machines and Kubuntu on a third---all GUIs that make Linux easier to use.) A GUI does make life easier in many ways, and what I like about one in a case like this is that if you're someone who has to manipulate pdf files rarely or only once, it's probably easier to just use a GUI than it is to learn the command line. Efficiency plays a role here, as well. If I'm going to use this all the time, it's definitely more efficient for me to learn the command line approach. But once or twice a year? Or only once ever? A GUI is much more efficient.
\textbf{tl;dr:} If you're only going to use a tool once, there's no issue with using the simplest tool required to get the job done.
\textbf{tl;dr:} If you're only going to use a tool once, there's no issue with using the simplest tool required to get the job done. There's no point in being a command-line ascetic.
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[scale=0.4]{pdfchain_-_title}
\includegraphics[scale=0.47]{pdfchain_-_title}
\end{center}
\chapter{Make Life Easier with bash Aliases}
\includegraphics[scale=0.8]{intermediate}
\medskip
I'm not going to get into the difference between the command line, the terminal, and bash (the Bourne Again Shell, if you are interested\footnote{You may not be, but after all, you are reading \textit{this} so you very well may be. I'll talk about that in a future issue.}) For now, let's just assume that you know about \texttt{ctrl alt t} opening a terminal window to get you access to the command line.
If you are used to using the command line, chances are that you have a certain set of commands that you use a lot. For example, if you're pushing to your Github repos all the time, you probably are typing \texttt{git push origin main} quite often. You can create a bash alias that makes your life a lot easier.
@ -194,11 +215,16 @@ $ pwd
\noindent{}where ``\texttt{username}'' is your login name. If you're \textit{not} in your home directory, you can get there with this command:
\bigskip
% We're doing it this way so we can get a better looking ~.
\noindent{}\verb=$ cd= $\sim$
\bigskip
\noindent{}The $\sim$~ is shorthand for your home directory. (If you are logged in to the terminal as your username, it takes to \texttt{/home/username}. If you are logged in to the terminal as \texttt{sudo}, it takes you to the \texttt{root} directory in the top level directory—where all those Linux directories are that we talked about in the last issue.) We are looking for an invisible file, so execute this command:
\noindent{}The $\sim$~ is shorthand for your home directory. (If you are logged in to the terminal as your username, it takes to \texttt{/home/username}. If you are logged in to the terminal as \texttt{sudo}, it takes you to the \texttt{root} directory in the top level directory—where all those Linux directories are that we talked about in the last issue.)
We are looking for an invisible file, so execute this command:
\begin{verbatim}
$ ls -a
@ -264,15 +290,15 @@ alias kls="ls -Ahl"
\begin{itemize}
\itemsep-0.4em
\item \texttt{A} lists all files and directories, including invisible ones (but excluding the . and .. directories\footnotemark).
\item \texttt{h} gives us file sizes in human readable sizes (i.e., ``4.0K'') instead of bytes.
\item \texttt{l} gives us the listing as a list, because I find that's more readable, especially with a directory that contains a lot of stuff.
\item \texttt{h} gives us file sizes in human readable sizes, i.e., ``4.0K'' instead of ``4096 bytes''.
\item \texttt{l} gives us the listing as a list, because I find that to be more readable, especially with a directory that contains a lot of stuff. I'd rather just scroll up and down than up and down \textit{and} right and left.
\end{itemize}
Again, I'm typing three keystrokes instead of seven. When you spend eight or more hours a day on the computers, whatever keystrokes you can save really start to add up.
Again, I'm typing three keystrokes instead of seven. When you spend eight or more hours a day on the computer, whatever keystrokes you can save really start to add up.
\footnotetext{If you've ever wondered about what these are, here's a simple explanation. The . (dot) represents the current working directory, i.e., the one that you are in. The .. (dot dot) represents the parent directory, i.e., the directory that contains the directory you are currently in. Whenever you create a directory in a Unix-based system, it is added as a new entry to its parent directory, and these two entries (hard links) are created in the new directory. \\ \tabto{1.9em}\texttt{ls} and \texttt{ls .} are the same command: they give you the contents of the directory you are in. \texttt{ls ..} gives you the contents of the parent directory to the one you are in. It's the same as going up into your parent directory, getting a content listing, and then moving back into the child directory you were just in. And for what it's worth, you can do \texttt{ls ../..} to get the content listing of the grandparent directory. Nifty? Depends on how lost you are. \\ \tabto{1.9em}\texttt{cd ..} will move you up into your parent directory, whereas \texttt{cd .} moves you nowhere, because you are literally telling the terminal to change the directory to the current directory. It's a bit like changing into the underpants you are currently wearing. \\ \tabto{1.9em}Anyway, enough of the stupid pet tricks.}
And that's it. Just about anything you type often on the command line can be turned into a bash alias to save you time. Go for it.
And that's it. Just about anything you type often on the command line can be turned into a bash alias to save you time. Go for it. It's a great way to manage your mischief.
\chapter{What Have I Installed?}

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