Browse Source

Numerous typofixes.

tags/Issue-001
Kenneth John Odle 1 year ago
parent
commit
959a11a569
  1. 4
      001/build/codex-001.aux
  2. 36
      001/build/codex-001.log
  3. 2
      001/build/codex-001.out
  4. BIN
      001/build/codex-001.pdf
  5. BIN
      001/build/codex-001.synctex.gz
  6. 4
      001/build/codex-001.toc
  7. 48
      001/codex-001.tex

4
001/build/codex-001.aux

@ -64,6 +64,6 @@
\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {7}Coda}{34}{chapter.7}\protected@file@percent }
\@writefile{lof}{\addvspace {10\p@ }}
\@writefile{lot}{\addvspace {10\p@ }}
\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.1}What I Learned About \LaTeX \tmspace +\thinmuskip {.1667em} While Creating This Issue}{34}{section.7.1}\protected@file@percent }
\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.2}Coda: Why \LaTeX ?}{35}{section.7.2}\protected@file@percent }
\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.1}What I Learned About \LaTeX {} While Creating This Issue}{34}{section.7.1}\protected@file@percent }
\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.2}Why \LaTeX ?}{35}{section.7.2}\protected@file@percent }
\@writefile{toc}{\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.3}What's Next?}{37}{section.7.3}\protected@file@percent }

36
001/build/codex-001.log

@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
This is pdfTeX, Version 3.14159265-2.6-1.40.20 (TeX Live 2019/Debian) (preloaded format=pdflatex 2021.9.5) 23 SEP 2021 21:06
This is pdfTeX, Version 3.14159265-2.6-1.40.20 (TeX Live 2019/Debian) (preloaded format=pdflatex 2021.9.5) 24 SEP 2021 18:31
entering extended mode
restricted \write18 enabled.
%&-line parsing enabled.
@ -882,12 +882,6 @@ Underfull \hbox (badness 7595) in paragraph at lines 166--167
\OT1/jkp/m/n/10 1921 by Theodore and Mil-ton
[]
Overfull \hbox (1.41647pt too wide) in paragraph at lines 177--178
[]\OT1/jkp/m/n/10 Anyway, that Wednes-day af-ter-noon ex-pe-ri-ence was a real
game changer
[]
[9] [10]
Chapter 2.
[11
@ -934,15 +928,6 @@ acker'' which
] [32] [33]
Chapter 7.
Package hyperref Warning: Token not allowed in a PDF string (PDFDocEncoding):
(hyperref) removing `\leavevmode@ifvmode' on input line 583.
Package hyperref Warning: Token not allowed in a PDF string (PDFDocEncoding):
(hyperref) \kern 1.66702pt
(hyperref) removed on input line 583.
[34
]
@ -952,8 +937,13 @@ Overfull \hbox (8.25641pt too wide) in paragraph at lines 598--599
[]
[35] [36]
Overfull \hbox (3.54332pt too wide) in paragraph at lines 638--639
[]\OT1/jkp/m/n/10 I'm not where I want to be yet (and I def-i-nitely won't be f
or a while|I've
[]
Package atveryend Info: Empty hook `BeforeClearDocument' on input line 642.
[37]
[37]
Package atveryend Info: Empty hook `AfterLastShipout' on input line 642.
(build/codex-001.aux)
Package atveryend Info: Executing hook `AtVeryEndDocument' on input line 642.
@ -963,8 +953,8 @@ Package rerunfilecheck Info: File `codex-001.out' has not changed.
Package atveryend Info: Empty hook `AtVeryVeryEnd' on input line 642.
)
Here is how much of TeX's memory you used:
8661 strings out of 483140
121921 string characters out of 5965152
8662 strings out of 483140
121933 string characters out of 5965152
380564 words of memory out of 5000000
23317 multiletter control sequences out of 15000+600000
592103 words of font info for 159 fonts, out of 8000000 for 9000
@ -981,10 +971,10 @@ nts/type1/public/kpfonts/jkpbn8a.pfb></usr/share/texlive/texmf-dist/fonts/type1
fonts/jkpmit8a.pfb></usr/share/texlive/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/kpfonts/jk
pmn8a.pfb></usr/share/texlive/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/kpfonts/jkpmne.pfb>
</usr/share/texlive/texmf-dist/fonts/type1/public/kpfonts/jkpttmn8a.pfb>
Output written on build/codex-001.pdf (37 pages, 177219 bytes).
Output written on build/codex-001.pdf (37 pages, 177677 bytes).
PDF statistics:
557 PDF objects out of 1000 (max. 8388607)
502 compressed objects within 6 object streams
157 named destinations out of 1000 (max. 500000)
558 PDF objects out of 1000 (max. 8388607)
503 compressed objects within 6 object streams
158 named destinations out of 1000 (max. 500000)
307 words of extra memory for PDF output out of 10000 (max. 10000000)

2
001/build/codex-001.out

@ -33,5 +33,5 @@
\BOOKMARK [0][-]{chapter.6}{Is This Really a Hack? Or Is It Just a Tip?}{}% 33
\BOOKMARK [0][-]{chapter.7}{Coda}{}% 34
\BOOKMARK [1][-]{section.7.1}{What I Learned About LaTeX While Creating This Issue}{chapter.7}% 35
\BOOKMARK [1][-]{section.7.2}{Coda: Why LaTeX?}{chapter.7}% 36
\BOOKMARK [1][-]{section.7.2}{Why LaTeX?}{chapter.7}% 36
\BOOKMARK [1][-]{section.7.3}{What's Next?}{chapter.7}% 37

BIN
001/build/codex-001.pdf

BIN
001/build/codex-001.synctex.gz

4
001/build/codex-001.toc

@ -32,6 +32,6 @@
\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {5}A Scanner Darkly, but with a workflow}{28}{chapter.5}%
\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {6}Is This Really a Hack? Or Is It Just a Tip?}{31}{chapter.6}%
\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {7}Coda}{34}{chapter.7}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.1}What I Learned About \LaTeX \tmspace +\thinmuskip {.1667em} While Creating This Issue}{34}{section.7.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.2}Coda: Why \LaTeX ?}{35}{section.7.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.1}What I Learned About \LaTeX {} While Creating This Issue}{34}{section.7.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.2}Why \LaTeX ?}{35}{section.7.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {7.3}What's Next?}{37}{section.7.3}%

48
001/codex-001.tex

@ -63,7 +63,7 @@
\author{Kenneth John Odle}
\title{{\Huge the codex}\\{\footnotesize Life with Linux — A Zine\\Typeset in \LaTeX}}
\date{\begin{small}2021.09.23\end{small}}
\date{\begin{small}2021.09.24\end{small}}
\begin{document}
\maketitle
@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ The image on the back cover is one that I highly agree with. We built it, it's o
(If you're reading this zine online in pdf form you won't see this cover, because it's not in this repo. You can check the \verb|.gitignore| file. If you \textit{really} want to see it, you'll need to buy a paper copy, which means we kill a tree and I get validation and a few bucks, and you get a picture of Linus Torvalds that you can see online for free anyway, if you are motivated enough. Weird, huh?)
You can just skip over all the diversions in you want. It's just how my mind works. (And yes, there will be politics in this. \textit{You have been warned.}) Also, I use a lot of em-dashes and parentheses because that is also how my mind works. It's just one big long stream of consciousness up in here most days.
You can just skip over all the diversions in you want. It's just how my mind works. (And yes, there will be politics in this. \textit{You have been warned.}) Also, I use a lot of em-dashes, parentheses, and footnotes because that is also how my mind works. It's just one big long stream of consciousness up in here most days.
\tableofcontents
@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ The answer to the second question is that we are teaching kids how to use calcul
\hrulefill
(Well, you can probably tell what my thoughts are on the dominant economic system on planet Earth. There \textit{will} be more of that. If you're okay with that, I'm okay with that, too. If you're not okay with it and you want your money back, it's too late—I've already spent it.\footnote{But that's capitalism for you! \textit{Caveat emptor!}})
(Uou can probably tell what my thoughts are on the dominant economic system on planet Earth. There \textit{will} be more of that. If you're okay with that, I'm okay with that, too. If you're not okay with it and you want your money back, it's too late—I've already spent it.\footnote{But that's capitalism for you! \textit{Caveat emptor!}})
I have noticed that even little kids are required to bring little kid calculators to school with them in most of the local school districts. As I write this, the school supply buying season is coming to an end, but for the past six weeks every store was filled with school supply lists and yeah, you have to have a calculator to get into the second grade.
@ -129,7 +129,7 @@ The other early calculator I remember was a Casio calculator and it was on a wat
\includegraphics[scale=0.15]{casio}
\end{wrapfigure}
Well, I grew up and I didn't buy one of them, even though they are still available. I could never justify spending the money on what is—let's face it—just a bit of full-frontal nerdity when there were bills to pay. Nope, just could never bring myself to do it.
I grew up and I didn't buy one of them, even though they are still available. I could never justify spending the money on what is—let's face it—just a bit of full-frontal nerdity when there were bills to pay. Nope, just could never bring myself to do it.
It's just me now, and my expenses are numerous but small, and a couple of years ago my local all-in-one-store had all their watches on sale for 40\% off, including the name brand watches. I checked—it was in stock. At \$25 bucks it was a lot, but on sale it was only \$15. I could do this! So I picked it up and looked at it lovingly, thinking about all the good times we would have together as we went forth and explored the world one simple calculation at a time.
@ -163,18 +163,18 @@ Those of us with fond memories of Radio Shack, and what it used to be, bristle a
A brief history shall ensue:
Radio Shack was founded in 1921 by Theodore and Milton Deutschmann, two brothers who wanted to cash in on the burgeoning ham radio field. Initially successful, it was nearly bankrupt in 1962, when it was acquired by the Tandy Corporation. If you've ever been in 4H, that name may ring a bell. Tandy is a leather goods corporation, and has been selling supplies for home leathercrafters since 1919. If you did leathercrafting as a 4H kid, chances are the introductory tool kit and all the materials you needed to make that belt or wallet, came from Tandy Leather Company.
Radio Shack was founded in 1921 by Theodore and Milton Deutschmann, two brothers who wanted to cash in on the burgeoning ham radio field. Initially successful, the company was nearly bankrupt in 1962, when it was acquired by the Tandy Corporation. If you've ever been in 4H, that name may ring a bell. Tandy was a leather goods corporation, and had been selling supplies for home leathercrafters since 1919. If you did leathercrafting as a 4H kid, chances are the introductory tool kit and all the materials you needed to make that belt or wallet, came from Tandy Leather Company.
Tandy actually ran Radio Shack fairly well until the mid 1990s, and had many electronic products with a ``Tandy'' name on them. But in 2000, they decided to drop the Tandy name altogether, and became the RadioShack (one word) Corporation. They sold the leather crafting assets to a company called The Leather Factory in the fall of that same year, and it still operates under the name of Tandy Leather. (If you're into making things from leather, you may want to look them up.)
Anyway, RadioShack decided to move away from electronic supplies and electronics and focus on selling cell phones, which was a ridiculous move, since everybody else was also selling cell phones. The period from the early 2000s forward was a period of decline, both in sales and morale (not to mention much clenching of teeth by regular shoppers—I went in to buy some screws to repair a laptop and they didn't even carry metric screws at that point), and finally resulted in bankruptcy in 2015.
RadioShack decided to move away from electronic supplies and electronics and focus on selling cell phones, which was a ridiculous move, since everybody else was also selling cell phones. The period from the early 2000s forward was a period of decline, both in sales and morale (not to mention much clenching of teeth by regular shoppers—I went in to buy some screws to repair a laptop and they didn't even carry metric screws at that point), and finally resulted in bankruptcy in 2015.
The name still exists, because other corporate entities bought the rights to it. So there are still RadioShack stores out there, but they're not Radio Shack. The Radio Shack that so many of knew and loved (it was my favorite store to visit at the mall when I was a teenager) is gone and will probably never come back. I mourn the Radio Shack of my youth as I mourn a long lost lover.
\end{multicols}
\hrulefill
Anyway, that Wednesday afternoon experience was a real game changer for me. It was the first time I had an opportunity to sit down at a computer for an extended period of time and actually accomplish something, rather than just tinker around with the keyboard. We could save our work on cassette tapes until next week, which meant that our projects had some permanence, although I'm certain that all those cassette tapes are either buried in the depths of a storage room somewhere at the skills center, or more likely are buried deep in a landfill somewhere.
That Wednesday afternoon experience was a real game changer for me. It was the first time I had an opportunity to sit down at a computer for an extended period of time and actually accomplish something, rather than just tinker around with the keyboard. We could save our work on cassette tapes until next week, which meant that our projects had some permanence, although I'm certain that all those cassette tapes are either buried in the depths of a storage room somewhere at the skills center, or more likely are buried deep in a landfill somewhere.
This was the golden age for my generation for computers. These days you can buy a computer magazine and it has a CD or DVD with programs for you to try out. (Although I haven't been in a bookstore since the pandemic started, so that may have changed.) In the early 80s, computer magazines had programs \textit{printed} in them, so if you wanted to try out a program, you had to very laboriously type it in, and then spend the rest of the evening debugging it before you actually got to spend the last 15 minutes before bedtime playing around with it.
@ -200,9 +200,9 @@ Wondering how something in Windows works? So is everybody else. There is nothing
And yeah, you can write code and create applications for Windows, and you can solve a lot of problems that way, but you can never make Windows itself better. It is what it is, and if you don't like it, the feature that bugs you might be made better in the next release, or it might be made worse. It's a crap shoot, really.
For what it's worth, Mac OS X, even though it is based on Unix/Linux (I forget which—I dropped out of the Mac world at OS X version 4), is the same way. There \textit{might} be an answer, there \textit{might} be a solution, but you just \textit{might} be on your own there, buddy.
For what it's worth, Mac OS X, even though it is based on Unix/Linux (I forget which—I dropped out of the Mac world at OS X version 4), is the same way. There \textit{might} be an answer, and there \textit{might} be a solution, but you just \textit{might} be on your own there, buddy.
That's the key when you're working with something that open-source: every problem is an opportunity for you to learn something. You might be able to find a workaround, or a fix, or even realize that you're doing something wrong, and that's why you're having a problem. Who knows, keep studying and trying things out and you might find an actual bug and be able to contribute a patch that fixes it.
That's the key when you're working with something that open-source: every problem is an opportunity for you to learn something. You might be able to find a workaround, or a fix, or even realize that you're doing something wrong, and that's why you're having a problem. Who knows? Keep studying and trying things out and you might find an actual bug and be able to contribute a patch that fixes it.
That will never happen when you use Windows or Mac. Never.
@ -224,7 +224,7 @@ I need to get that on a t-shirt.
\medskip
Why? Because the command line is like real life. There is no undo button in real life. GUIs have made us lazy—lazy at thinking, lazy at figuring things out. Just do it, if you don't like it, just Ctrl-Z. Just throw that document away and leave it in the recycle bin. If you decide you want/need it later, you can just drag it on out of there.
Why? Because the command line is like real life. There is no undo button in real life. GUIs have made us lazy—lazy at thinking, lazy at figuring things out. Just do it: if you don't like it, just Ctrl-Z. Just throw that document away and leave it in the recycle bin. If you decide you want/need it later, you can just drag it on out of there.
With a GUI, that ``undo'' button is always an option.\footnote{Except for the rare occasion when it isn't. Those times are fun.} But in real life, you can't \textit{unmake} a mistake. Sure, you can recover from a mistake, but you are going to have to do some scrambling, my friend, and if you are at least halfway intelligent, you will definitely think twice about trying that again, or at least trying it \textit{that way} again. You don't want to jump through all those hoops again, so you think about your end goal and try to develop a better workflow for next time.
@ -232,11 +232,11 @@ The command line, in short, makes you think. It makes you plan, it makes you thi
A GUI only makes you think about the next step. Surely all the steps after that will be obvious, \textit{n'est ce pas}? I've seen a lot of people ask questions online where they just want to be told which button to push. They are asking about how to cross the street when what they really want to do is get across town.
They are asking for \textit{information} when what they really need is \textit{knowledge}.
They are asking for \textit{information} when what they really need is \textit{knowledge}. Sadly, we have too much \textit{information} when what we really need is \textit{knowledge}.
\section{The Unix Philosophy}
The Unix Philosophy was originated by Ken Thompson (one of the creators of Unix, upon which Linux is based) and basically says that each program should do one thing and do it well. (There is more to it than this; if you are interested, you can always google it.\footnote{Searching for something on the internet is \textit{always} an option these days, and so many people seem to be unable to do just that. Honestly, this is the kind of stuff that gets my underpants in a twist. \\ \tabto{1.9em}Question: ``Where can I find \textit{X}?'' Answer: The same place I would find it: At the other end of a google search. \\ \tabto{1.9em}Better question: ``Which is the \textbf{best} source for \textit{X}? Ah, \textit{now} we have the basis for a discussion.}
The Unix Philosophy was originated by Ken Thompson (one of the creators of Unix, upon which Linux is based) and basically says that each program should do one thing and do it well. (There is more to it than this; if you are interested, you can always google it.)\footnote{Searching for something on the internet is \textit{always} an option these days, and so many people seem to be unable to do just that. Honestly, this is the kind of stuff that gets my underpants in a twist. \\ \tabto{1.9em}Question: ``Where can I find \textit{X}?'' Answer: The same place I would find it: At the other end of a google search. \\ \tabto{1.9em}Better question: ``Which is the \textbf{best} source for \textit{X}? Ah, \textit{now} we have the basis for a discussion. I'll put the kettle on and we can talk about it.}
This runs counter to physical life, where everything has to be a Swiss army watch. Watch any ad for a new kitchen gadget and this device does \textit{everything} except walk the dog and take out the trash. If it \textit{actually} did all those things and did them well, I would be happy to own one and more than happy to pay a couple of hundred dollars for it.
@ -276,11 +276,11 @@ Sure, there are always those oddball tasks that you have to do once a year or le
\item \textbf{Cutting cheese} — I have a knife with a 4" blade with holes in it. The idea is that holes prevent the cheese slices from sticking to the cheese. I had an expensive (\$15!) cheese knife that did an okay job; it also had a two-prong fork on the end to pick up the slice of cheese with. My current one has a shorter, thicker blade that does an excellent job. I paid \$4 for it at Menard's. It simply outperformed the more expensive knife. Sometimes less \textit{is} actually more.
\end{itemize}
I know that someone out there is itching to point out that tomatoes aren't potatoes and potatoes aren't carrots, \textit{ad infinitum}, and thus the Unix Principle doesn't apply. Well, there are a lot of different pdfs out there, as well, and if I'm skilled with a command line application (such as \verb|pdftk|) it doesn't really matter which pdf I'm dealing with. The job of a knife is to cut. If you keep the knife sharp\footnote{Sharpening a knife is a skill in and of itself. If you watch someone that's good at it, you'll realize that it's also an art form. You can get the skill with practice; you can learn the art with long experience. This is something else that you need to learn.} and \textit{learn how to use it properly}, you'll be a lot more efficient in the kitchen. Notice the emphasis on learning how to use a tool properly. You can learn a lot just by reading the manual. (Go to your terminal and type in \verb|man knife|.)
I know that someone out there is itching to point out that tomatoes aren't potatoes and potatoes aren't carrots, \textit{ad infinitum}, and thus the Unix Principle doesn't apply. Well, there are a lot of different pdfs out there, as well, and if I'm skilled with a command line application (such as \verb|pdftk|) it doesn't really matter which pdf I'm dealing with. The job of a knife is to cut. If you keep the knife sharp\footnote{Sharpening a knife is a skill in and of itself. If you watch someone that's good at it, you'll realize that it's also an art form. You can get the skill with practice; you can learn the art with long experience. That is really the only way to learn this; there are no shortcuts.} and \textit{learn how to use it properly}, you'll be a lot more efficient in the kitchen. Notice the emphasis on learning how to use a tool properly. You can learn a lot just by reading the manual. (Go to your terminal and type in \verb|man knife|.)
\medskip
\noindent \textbf{Breadmakers} — I'm going on a limb here, because a lot of people will be happy to point out that there are sorts of breadmakers will all sorts of settings. Relax. Breadmakers are designed to do one thing: turn flour, water, yeast, and salt into dough, and then turn that dough into bread. All those settings are just options.
\noindent \textbf{Breadmakers} — I'm going out on a limb here, because a lot of people will be happy to point out that there are sorts of breadmakers will all sorts of settings. Relax. Breadmakers are designed to do one thing: turn flour, water, yeast, and salt into dough, and then turn that dough into bread. All those settings are just options.
I've resisted buying a breadmaker for years, because I actually don't want a device in my kitchen that only does one thing, and I've always known how to make bread from scratch. But as I get older, I don't always have the time or patience to make homemade bread (it can be a messy process), and a breadmaker is ideal. It does one thing, and it does it really well. (Hint: bread machine yeast is your friend.)
@ -304,7 +304,7 @@ That is really the only purpose that a car has: to get you from point A to point
My first car was a 1980 Ford Escort with two doors, a hatchback, an AM radio,\footnote{Although the old couple who had owned it installed some excellent speakers and an FM converter, which was a thing back in the day.} and a four-speed manual transmission. It got me where I was going and back again, and it did it in a very economical manner. There was never anything on the AM radio, and FM reception was spotty, so the only entertainment I had was what was out the window, whatever discussion I had with passengers, and my own mind. I would often take long rides in the country on the weekend in it, and since it did not have any reliable way to entertain me, I actually had to \textit{notice} my surroundings. This was the pre-digital age, so there was no mobile phone in my pocket to stop and take pictures with.\footnote{Or the ultimate monument to vanity, the selfie.} If I wanted pictures, I had to plan ahead and buy film for my 35mm camera.
Out of the cars I've ever owned, that is the one with second fondest memories.\footnote{I could talk about my Chevrolet Corsica, which the most happy, and happiest memories, but that's for another zine.}
Out of all the cars I've ever owned, that is the one with the second fondest memories.\footnote{I could talk about my Chevrolet Corsica, which was the car I had the most happy (i.e., quantity, and the happiest (i.e., quality) memories, but that's for another zine.}
Nowadays, the purpose of a car is to get you from point A to point B and not allow you to become bored for even a millisecond. Heaven forbid you should get bored on your morning commute. I don't remember ever becoming bored while driving that old car, even though I'm sure I did. But I had a brain that was trained to entertain itself, so such moments were rare and short-lived enough that I don't recall them ever occurring.
@ -369,7 +369,7 @@ These are violations of the Unix Principle that actually work well and that I ca
\chapter{What Are All Those Files in the Linux Root?}
If you're using a Linux distro with a GUI (Ubuntu, Puppy OS, Mint, etc.) you land right in your Home folder whenever you click on ``Files''. But if you've ever gone all the way into the root of your computer (the Windows equivalent would be \verb|C:\|) you'll see a lot of folders\footnote{Technically, these are \textit{directories}, but let's not be pedantic. In a GUI, the icon usually looks like a folder.} there with mysterious three-letter names. Let's take a look at the them and what they contain.\footnotemark
\footnotetext{For more information about this, consult the Linux Foundation Referenced specifications, which are found at \href{https://refspecs.linuxfoundation.org/}{https://refspecs.linuxfoundation.org/}. You're probably going to want the pdf version of this, which is at \href{https://refspecs.linuxfoundation.org/FHS_3.0/fhs-3.0.pdf}{https://refspecs.linuxfoundation.org/FHS\_3.0/fhs-3.0.pdf}. It really is amazing how much you can learn just by reading the specs and manuals. Scotty was right.}
\footnotetext{For more information about this, consult the Linux Foundation Reference specifications, which are found at \href{https://refspecs.linuxfoundation.org/}{https://refspecs.linuxfoundation.org/}. You're probably going to want the pdf version of this, which is at \href{https://refspecs.linuxfoundation.org/FHS_3.0/fhs-3.0.pdf}{https://refspecs.linuxfoundation.org/FHS\_3.0/fhs-3.0.pdf}. It really is amazing how much you can learn just by reading the specs and manuals. Scotty was right.}
\section{bin}
This directory contains essential command binaries\footnote{Files that contain compiled source or machine code. They are also called ``executables'' because they can be run (i.e., ``executed'') on the computer. Programs, if you will.} that need to be available for all users. Many of these include binaries that bring up the system or repair it. Your basic binaries like \verb|cat|, \verb|ls|, and \verb|mv| live here.
@ -428,7 +428,7 @@ $ modinfo module_name
To list the options that are set for a loaded module:
\begin{verbatim}
$systool -v -m module_name
$ systool -v -m module_name
\end{verbatim}
To display the configuration of a particular module:
@ -547,7 +547,7 @@ $ pdftk A=001a.pdf B=001b.pdf shuffle A Bend-1 output 001.pdf
\end{verbatim}
\chapter{Is This Really a Hack? Or Is It Just a Tip?}
The word ``hacker'' has a lot of definitions, and if you just google it, you'll find a lot of scary ones on the websites of companies that want you to be scared of ``hackers'' and then spend hundreds of dollars on their security products, some of which may actually protect you against actual threats, and some of which may provide protection against a threat which isn't actually real.
The word ``hacker'' has a lot of definitions, and if you just google it, you'll find a lot of scary ones on the websites of companies that want you to be scared of ``hackers'' and then you will spend hundreds of dollars on their security products, some of which may actually protect you against actual threats, and some of which may provide protection against a threat which isn't actually real.
(And yes, there are bad people out there who use their advanced technical knowledge to attain access to systems that they shouldn't have in order to obtain information they're not supposed to have. I'm not talking about those people, who technically should be called ``crackers'' a l\'{a} ``safe crackers''.)
@ -568,10 +568,10 @@ So let's look at some things that have been called ``hacks'' but may or may not
\item \textbf{Microwave lemons and limes to get more juice out of them} — A tip, not a hack.
\item \textbf{Freeze cheese to make it easier to grate} — I do this all the time, and it's a great technique. The trick is leave the cheese in the freezer for just the right amount of time. Not a hack.
\item \textbf{Refrigerate onions before chopping them so they don't make you cry} — Chilling the onions makes the volatile sulfur compounds in them less volatile, so this works, provided you chop fast. It's not a hack, but it is a good technique.
\item \textbf{Wear swim goggles while chopping onions so they don't make you cry} — I'll call this one a hack.
\item \textbf{Wear swim goggles while chopping onions so they don't make you cry} — I'll call this one a hack. Goggles normally protect your eyes from liquid water. Using them to protect your eyes from volatile sulfur compounds is an appropriate application of ingenuity, since I doubt most home cooks have lab quality eye goggles.
\item \textbf{Use parchment paper in place of muffin liners} — The purpose of parchment paper is to get between your food and whatever it's being cooked on or in. If you run out of muffin liners, you can just use squares of parchment paper. This is just using parchment paper for what it's meant to be used for, albeit in an atypical way because we have another product that we use in this instance. A great technique to use on a regular basis; a great tip if you've never heard of it before. But not a hack. (I actually think the corners sticking it up would make it easier to get the muffins out of the pan.)
\item \textbf{Flavor your pasta water with a chicken stock cube} — Not a hack. Anyone who grew up eating instant ramen on a regular basis figured this one out by the time they hit double digits.
\item \textbf{Use a potato masher to break up ground meat} — While technically a potato masher is meant to be used on potatoes, its ultimate purpose is to mash big things into little things.\footnote{It's right there in the name!} This is like using a screwdriver to pry up a lid of paint. It's not a hack because it's so obvious.
\item \textbf{Use a potato masher to break up ground meat} — While technically a potato masher is meant to be used on potatoes,\footnote{It's right there in the name.} its ultimate purpose is to mash big things into little things.\footnote{It's right there in the name!} This is like using a screwdriver to pry up a lid of paint. It's not a hack because it's so obvious.
\item \textbf{Collect all your vegetable scraps in a freezer bag and use them to make stock} — Not a hack. Just frugality in action.
\item \textbf{Buy the biggest cutting board you can find} — While this is great advice, it's not a hack.
\end{enumerate}
@ -580,7 +580,7 @@ So, 15 ``cooking hacks'' and only two of them are actual hacks, and one of them
\chapter{Coda}
\section{What I Learned About \LaTeX\, While Creating This Issue}
\section{What I Learned About \LaTeX{} While Creating This Issue}
I'm still a relative newbie to LaTeX, so there's always something to learn. Here's a running list of what I've learned so far:
@ -588,7 +588,7 @@ I'm still a relative newbie to LaTeX, so there's always something to learn. Here
\item You might think you want the \textbf{book} document class, but you probably will find the \textbf{report} class just as handy.
\item You want links?\footnote{Yeah, I know these are irrelevant in a paper document.} Use the \textbf{hyperref} package.
\item The \textbf{kpfonts} package has beautiful fonts.
\item Footnotes are easy! (Seriously, footnotes in \LaTeX \,have got to be the easiest footnotes I've ever managed.)
\item Footnotes are easy! (Seriously, footnotes in \LaTeX{} have got to be the easiest footnotes I've ever managed.)
\item Use the \textbf{fancyhdr} package to get more granular control over your headers and footers.
\item You can use the \textbf{geometry} package to make a document have a paper size of half letter (i.e., 5.5 inches by 8.5 inches).
\item You can make your top margin larger by using \verb|\addtolength| \\ \verb|{\topmargin}{0.5in}| but there is not a similar parameter for the bottom margin. Instead, you need to make the text box shorter by using \verb|\addtolength{\textheight}{-1in}|.
@ -602,7 +602,7 @@ I'm still a relative newbie to LaTeX, so there's always something to learn. Here
If you are interested, there is a link in the Impressum to the git repo for this publication where you can check out the source code.
\section{Coda: Why \LaTeX?}
\section{Why \LaTeX?}
There are lots of reasons why I wanted to use \LaTeX to create this zine. I've been learning the language on my own lately, and I really just wanted to set myself a new challenge. It's always good to have challenges. If you poke around the website where you can find this zine, you'll find some other projects that are also typeset in LaTeX.
@ -635,7 +635,7 @@ Also, there is no easy way to get a word-count from a LaTeX document, nor is the
\noindent to convert this \verb|.tex| document to a LibreOffice document and counted the words there. (It couldn't find the two images I include in this document, but that's okay.) Before I added the last three sentences, I was at 6,515 words. I didn't bother to do a spell-check.
I'm not there yet (and I definitely won't be for a while—I've got bills to pay) but perhaps the nicest thing about LaTeX is that while there are a lot of packages available, if you can't find one to do what you want to do, you can always create your own. It will be a while before I get to that point because first I need to find something I want to do in LaTeX that isn't covered by an existing package, but I someday might. Remember, with the level of control you get with Linux, you also get opportunity. And it's always good to have a challenge to look forward to.
I'm not where I want to be yet (and I definitely won't be for a while—I've got bills to pay) but perhaps the nicest thing about LaTeX is that while there are a lot of packages available, if you can't find one to do what you want to do, you can always create your own. It will be a while before I get to that point because first I need to find something I want to do in LaTeX that isn't covered by an existing package, but I someday might. Remember, with the level of control you get with Linux, you also get opportunity. And it's always good to have a challenge to look forward to.
\section{What's Next?}
Loading…
Cancel
Save