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Updated example labels

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Kenneth John Odle 8 months ago
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  1. 22
      003/codex-003.tex

22
003/codex-003.tex

@ -311,7 +311,7 @@ And it also has what I believe is chord notation (although I could be—and prob
I didn't create that. (I don't even know what it means.) I just copied it verbatim from the \texttt{harmony} guide. In reality, it looks like this:
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, framesep=3mm, label=Harmony example]
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, xleftmargin=5mm, framesep=3mm, label=\fbox{Harmony Example}]
%
\def\h#1h{\hspace*{#1em}}
\newcommand{\Str}[2][0.5]{\raise#1ex\hbox to #2em{\hrulefill}}
@ -328,7 +328,7 @@ What this tells me is that the \texttt{harmony} package is very good at position
And then there is the \texttt{musixtex} package. It makes use of a \texttt{music} environment, with your relevant code (of which there is a lot). I've copied this bit from the \texttt{musixtex} documentation:
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, framesep=3mm, label=Musixtex example]
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, xleftmargin=5mm, framesep=3mm, label=\fbox{Musixtex Example}]
\begin{music}
\instrumentnumber{1} % a single instrument
\setname1{Piano} % whose name is Piano
@ -374,7 +374,7 @@ The \texttt{songs} package\footnote{Which is available on SourceForge---see my l
This code:
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, framesep=3mm, label=Songs example \#1]
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, framesep=3mm, label=\fbox{Songs Example \#1}]
\gtab{A}{X02220:001230}
\end{Verbatim}
@ -384,7 +384,7 @@ This code:
\noindent{}Like it? Here's another:
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, framesep=3mm, label=Songs example \#2]
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, framesep=3mm, label=\fbox{Songs Example \#2}]
\gtab{C#sus4}{4:XX3341}
\end{Verbatim}
@ -532,7 +532,7 @@ For best results, stick to the hierarchical structure shown above, as this is al
For example, this code:
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, xleftmargin=5mm, label=Enumerate Example, framesep=3mm]
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, xleftmargin=5mm, label=\fbox{Enumerate Example}, framesep=3mm]
\paragraph{The First Punic War}
\begin{enumerate}[noitemsep]
\item Carthage and Rome
@ -578,7 +578,7 @@ Similar to the \texttt{enumerate} environment, the \texttt{itemize} environment
As an example, we'll use the above example, but as a bulleted list:
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, xleftmargin=5mm, label=Itemize Example, framesep=3mm]
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, xleftmargin=5mm, label=\fbox{Itemize Example}, framesep=3mm]
\paragraph{The First Punic War}
\begin{itemize}[noitemsep]
\item Carthage and Rome
@ -620,7 +620,7 @@ As an example, we'll use the above example, but as a bulleted list:
\noindent{} You can also replace the bullets with any math symbol available in \LaTeX{} like this:
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, xleftmargin=5mm, label=Bullets Example, framesep=3mm]
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, numbers=left, xleftmargin=5mm, label=\fbox{Bullets Example}, framesep=3mm]
\begin{itemize}[noitemsep]
\item[$\Box$] First item
\item[$\aleph$] Second item
@ -642,7 +642,7 @@ As an example, we'll use the above example, but as a bulleted list:
There are two types of \textit{entry modes} for math in LaTeX. The first is \textbf{in-line mode}, which begins and ends with a dollar sign, and renders the math in the same line of text as the rest of the paragraph.
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, label=In-Line Math Example, framesep=3mm]
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, label=\fbox{In-Line Math Example}, framesep=3mm]
The Pythagorean Theorem is $x^2 + y^2 = z^2$.
\end{Verbatim}
@ -654,7 +654,7 @@ This is particularly useful if you want to include Greek characters in your text
Math in \LaTeX{} can also be shown in \textbf{display mode}, which renders the mathematics on a separate line. This entry mode begins with \verb+\[+ and ends with \verb+\]+. If we change our example up above to this:
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, label=Display Mode Math Example, framesep=3mm]
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, label=\fbox{Display Mode Math Example}, framesep=3mm]
The Pythagorean Theorem is \[x^2 + y^2 = z^2\]
\end{Verbatim}
@ -757,6 +757,8 @@ Nemo is actually a fork of Nautilus (version 3.4, I believe) and includes a lot
It turns out that installing Nemo and making it the default file manager is fairly simple. These are the commands you need:
\vspace{-8pt}
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines, xleftmargin=5mm, numbers=left, baselinestretch=1.2, breaklines=true]
sudo apt install nemo -y
xdg-mime default nemo.desktop inode/directory application/x-gnome-saved-search
@ -775,6 +777,8 @@ gsettings set org.nemo.desktop show-desktop-icons true
\noindent{}Removal is the opposite of installation:
\vspace{-8pt}
\begin{Verbatim}[frame=lines,xleftmargin=5mm, numbers=left, baselinestretch=1.2, breaklines=true]
xdg-mime default nautilus.desktop inode/directory application/x-gnome-saved-search
gsettings set org.gnome.desktop.background show-desktop-icons true

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