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Added picture of Commodore 64

tags/Issue-002
Kenneth John Odle 1 year ago
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c30da3f9a3
  1. 12
      002/codex-002.tex
  2. BIN
      002/images/c64.png

12
002/codex-002.tex

@ -120,6 +120,8 @@ The buttons are from the Button Optimizer website, which is here: \href{https://
\noindent \textbf{Credit where credit is due:} A lot of people have come forth (mostly from Reddit) to help me out in various ways. See the preamble to this document in the source code to see them. One aspect of our society is that nobody \textit{has} to help you. It is wonderful when it happens, and I am grateful for their help.
The picture on page 6 of a Commodore 64 is courtesy of Bill Bertram. It was published at \href{https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Commodore64.png}{\texttt{https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Commodo \\ re64.png}} where you can also find the Creative Commons 2.5 license it was licensed under. I did slightly crop the top and bottom to make it fit better. LaTeX didn't care.
\tableofcontents
\chapter{The Later Salad Days}
@ -198,6 +200,16 @@ I can at last sleep soundly.
\medskip
Let's get back to our story.
I purchased this computer from the back of a K-Mart, in much the same way the men in town went to the back of the video store to rent porn. I guess it's fair to say that I lusted after this computer (although a much different form of lust) so the comparison is apt.
\begin{wrapfigure}[]{h}{0.5\textwidth}
\includegraphics[scale=0.25]{c64}
\end{wrapfigure}
Unfortunately, when you bought a computer in those days you got exactly that in the box: a computer. There was no monitor, there was no disk drive, there was no printer. You just got a computer in a box with a power cord. I had scrimped and saved forever to buy this, and had fortunately also managed to save enough for a monitor, which in those days was a big, heavy cathode-ray tube device (CRT, for short). One of the selling points of the C-64 was that it was portable. You could just pick it up and take it with you. (It seems like all computers in the movies back in the day either took up entire rooms or buildings---think Hal-9000 in \textit{2001: A Space Odyssey} or something you could carry in your hand---think the tricorders in \textit{Star Trek}. We've never managed a happy medium.) The monitor, however, was anything \textit{but} portable. It was heavy, it was bulky, and it was fragile. Slam a lid closed on a modern laptop and everything will probably be fine. Knock a CRT off the table and it's toast. If it lands on your foot, you'll probably end up in a cast.
\section{High School Computer Class}
\chapter{A Scanner Clearly, or More Thoughts on Being an Archivist}

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