Browse Source

Numerous typofixes

tags/Issue-001
Kenneth John Odle 11 months ago
parent
commit
cba503b7f5
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Chapter 1.
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\contentsline {section}{\numberline {2.1}Control…and an Opportunity}{10}{section.2.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {2.2}Knowledge is Power}{11}{section.2.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {2.3}The Unix Philosophy}{12}{section.2.3}%
\contentsline {subsection}{\numberline {2.3.1}Where does the Unix Principle actually apply in real life?}{13}{subsection.2.3.1}%
\contentsline {subsection}{\numberline {2.3.2}Where else does the Unix Principle \textit {not} apply that it probably should in real life?}{16}{subsection.2.3.2}%
\contentsline {subsection}{\numberline {2.3.3}Where does the Unix Principle not apply in real life and this is actually a good thing?}{16}{subsection.2.3.3}%
\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {3}What Are All Those Files in the Linux Root?}{17}{chapter.3}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.1}bin}{17}{section.3.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.2}boot}{18}{section.3.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.3}dev}{18}{section.3.3}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.4}etc}{18}{section.3.4}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.5}home}{18}{section.3.5}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.6}lib}{18}{section.3.6}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.7}media}{19}{section.3.7}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.8}mnt}{19}{section.3.8}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.9}opt}{19}{section.3.9}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.10}proc}{19}{section.3.10}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.11}root}{19}{section.3.11}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.12}run}{19}{section.3.12}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.13}sbin}{19}{section.3.13}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.14}srv}{20}{section.3.14}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.15}sys}{20}{section.3.15}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.16}tmp}{20}{section.3.16}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.17}usr}{20}{section.3.17}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.18}var}{20}{section.3.18}%
\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {4}Miscellany}{21}{chapter.4}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {4.1}Is This Really a Hack? Or Is It Just a Tip?}{21}{section.4.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {4.2}What I Learned About \LaTeX \tmspace +\thinmuskip {.1667em} While Creating This Issue}{23}{section.4.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {4.3}Coda: Why \LaTeX ?}{25}{section.4.3}%
\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {1}The Early Salad Days}{4}{chapter.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {1.1}Calculators}{4}{section.1.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {1.2}Speaking of Watches, Timex Used to make Home Computers}{6}{section.1.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {1.3}The Joy of a Trash-80}{7}{section.1.3}%
\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {2}What's to Like About Linux}{9}{chapter.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {2.1}Control…and an Opportunity}{9}{section.2.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {2.2}Knowledge is Power}{10}{section.2.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {2.3}The Unix Philosophy}{11}{section.2.3}%
\contentsline {subsection}{\numberline {2.3.1}Where does the Unix Principle actually apply in real life?}{12}{subsection.2.3.1}%
\contentsline {subsection}{\numberline {2.3.2}Where else does the Unix Principle \textit {not} apply that it probably should in real life?}{15}{subsection.2.3.2}%
\contentsline {subsection}{\numberline {2.3.3}Where does the Unix Principle not apply in real life and this is actually a good thing?}{15}{subsection.2.3.3}%
\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {3}What Are All Those Files in the Linux Root?}{16}{chapter.3}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.1}bin}{16}{section.3.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.2}boot}{17}{section.3.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.3}dev}{17}{section.3.3}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.4}etc}{17}{section.3.4}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.5}home}{17}{section.3.5}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.6}lib}{17}{section.3.6}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.7}media}{18}{section.3.7}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.8}mnt}{18}{section.3.8}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.9}opt}{18}{section.3.9}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.10}proc}{18}{section.3.10}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.11}root}{18}{section.3.11}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.12}run}{18}{section.3.12}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.13}sbin}{18}{section.3.13}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.14}srv}{19}{section.3.14}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.15}sys}{19}{section.3.15}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.16}tmp}{19}{section.3.16}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.17}usr}{19}{section.3.17}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {3.18}var}{19}{section.3.18}%
\contentsline {chapter}{\numberline {4}Miscellany}{20}{chapter.4}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {4.1}Is This Really a Hack? Or Is It Just a Tip?}{20}{section.4.1}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {4.2}What I Learned About \LaTeX \tmspace +\thinmuskip {.1667em} While Creating This Issue}{22}{section.4.2}%
\contentsline {section}{\numberline {4.3}Coda: Why \LaTeX ?}{24}{section.4.3}%

40
001/codex-001.tex

@ -4,6 +4,7 @@
%\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{amssymb}
\usepackage{makeidx}
\makeindex
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{kpfonts}
\raggedbottom
@ -59,7 +60,7 @@
\author{Kenneth John Odle}
\title{{\Huge the codex}\\{\footnotesize Life with Linux — A Zine\\Typeset in \LaTeX}}
\date{2021\\ 2 September}
\date{5 September 2021\\\begin{small}2021.09.05\end{small}}
\begin{document}
\maketitle
@ -106,7 +107,7 @@ The answer to the second question is that we are teaching kids how to use calcul
I have noticed that even little kids are required to bring little kid calculators to school with them in most of the local school districts. As I write this, the school supply buying season is coming to an end, but for the past six weeks every store was filled with school supply lists and yeah, you have to have a calculator to get into the second grade.
Ironically, the earliest calculators I can remember seeing (not getting my hands on, because they didn't belong to me) were Texas Instruments calculators. I don't remember a lot about them, but an uncle had given a pair to two of my cousins. They took a \textit{ton} of batteries, had red LEDs for outputs (meaning they glowed in the dark—you could use them in the dark if you memorized the keypad), and they were designed for students because they had a go-back-through-all-your-steps-function-to-see-where-you-done-screwed-up-boy function, which would be a useful feature on modern calculators to learn math, but again, we're not interested in kids actually learning how to think and do something as radical as math.
Ironically, the earliest calculators I can remember seeing (not getting my hands on, because they didn't belong to me) were Texas Instruments calculators. I don't remember a lot about them, but an uncle had given a pair to two of my cousins. They took a \textit{ton} of batteries, had red LEDs for outputs (meaning they glowed in the dark—you could use them in the dark if you memorized the keypad), and they were designed for students because they had a go-back-through-all-your-steps-to-see-where-you-done-screwed-up-boy function, which would be a useful feature on modern calculators to learn math, but again, we're not interested in kids actually learning how to think and do something as radical as math.
The other early calculator I remember was a Casio calculator and it was on a watch. A kid I knew for a short time had one, and even let me wear it for a while. (I wish I could remember his name, because this was a tremendous kindness on his part.) I swore that when I grew up, I would own one of these watches.
@ -116,11 +117,11 @@ The other early calculator I remember was a Casio calculator and it was on a wat
\includegraphics[scale=0.15]{casio}
\end{wrapfigure}
Well, I grew up and I didn't buy one of them, even though they are still available. I could just never justify spending the money on what is—let's face it: just a bit of full-frontal nerdity—when there were bills to pay. Nope, just could never bring myself to do it.
Well, I grew up and I didn't buy one of them, even though they are still available. I could just never justify spending the money on what is—let's face it—just a bit of full-frontal nerdity when there were bills to pay. Nope, just could never bring myself to do it.
It's just me now, and my expenses are numerous but small, and a couple of years ago my local all-in-one-store had all their watches on sale for 40\% off, including the name brand watches. I checked—it was in stock. At \$25 bucks it was a lot, but on sale it was only \$15. I could do this! So I picked it up and looked at it lovingly, thinking about all the good times we would have together as we went forth and explored the world one simple calculation at a time.
But there was a problem, a rather large problem, actually. The print on those buttons is tiny. And my eyes are bad. I couldn't actually read any of buttons. I use reading glasses when I'm reading or working on the computer, but I don't need them out in the wild. I could wear the watch with me everywhere, but unless I were at my desk, I wouldn't be able to actually use it.
But there was a problem. A rather large problem, actually. The print on those buttons is tiny. And my eyes are bad. I couldn't actually read any of buttons. I use reading glasses when I'm reading or working on the computer, but I don't need them out in the wild. I could wear the watch with me everywhere, but unless I were at my desk, I wouldn't be able to actually use it.
Back on the shelf it went. I'm not going to spend money on something that is not actually useful to me.
@ -128,7 +129,7 @@ At this point, my only hope is that maybe my eyes will get so bad that I'll need
\section{Speaking of Watches, Timex Used to make Home Computers}
My earliest memory of a computer in somebody's home is of being in an aunt's apartment, and she had a Timex Sinclair hooked up to her television.
My earliest memory of a computer in somebody's home is of being in an aunt's apartment, where she had a Timex Sinclair hooked up to her television.
I don't remember much about it, actually, other than it was small and sleek and very modern-looking. I do remember that I was not allowed to touch it.\footnote{This aunt bought things not because she found them useful, but because other people didn't have them and she wanted to always have a status symbol to point to. I don't remember her actually doing anything \textit{useful} with this computer.}
@ -138,13 +139,13 @@ This is where memory gets wonky, because I remember seeing this when I was about
\section{The Joy of a Trash-80}
One thing I'm quite sure about is that in seventh grade a select group of smart kids from my class were allowed to go to the local "skills center"\footnote{This was a centralized school where eleventh and twelfth graders who definitely weren't going on to college could take classes like agriculture and welding. We used to teach these classes in each school under the guise of "vocational education" but somehow lost our way.} one day a week (Wednesday afternoons, as I recall) to study computers. This was the first time I'd every laid my fingers on an actual computer keyboard.
One thing I'm quite sure about is that in seventh grade a select group of smart kids from my class were allowed to go to the local ``skills center''\footnote{This was a centralized school where eleventh and twelfth graders who definitely weren't going on to college could take classes like agriculture and welding. We used to teach these classes in each school under the guise of ``vocational education'' but somehow lost our way.} one day a week (Wednesday afternoons, as I recall) to study computers. This was the first time I'd every laid my fingers on an actual computer keyboard.
\hrulefill
\textbf{Oh look, another diversion.}
\begin{multicols}{2}
"TRS" actually stands for "The Radio Shack," as in \textit{The Radio Shack 80}. This program had a room full of TRS-80 Model IIIs, with an integrated keyboard, and, if I recall correctly,\footnote{But I probably don't.} two integrated 5.5" floppy disk drives. I loved Radio Shack both because the first computer I was ever allowed to sink my teeth into was a Trash-80 and because for a while there in my youth, it was a tinkerer's paradise.
``TRS'' actually stands for ``The Radio Shack,'' as in \textit{The Radio Shack 80}. This program had a room full of TRS-80 Model IIIs, with an integrated keyboard, and, if I recall correctly,\footnote{But I probably don't.} two integrated 5.5" floppy disk drives. I loved Radio Shack both because the first computer I was ever allowed to sink my teeth into was a Trash-80 and because for a while there in my youth, it was a tinkerer's paradise.
Those of us with fond memories of Radio Shack, and what it used to be, bristle at the memory of how it was terribly mismanaged at the end of its life. But in some weird postmodern way, Radio Shack does live on, but not as you might expect.
@ -198,7 +199,7 @@ I need to get that on a t-shirt.
Why? Because the command line is like real life. There is no undo button in real life. GUIs have made us lazy—lazy at thinking, lazy at figuring things out. Just do it, if you don't like it, just Ctrl-Z. Just throw that document away and leave it in the recycle bin. If you decide you want/need it later, you can just drag it on out of there.
With a GUI, that "undo" button is always an option.\footnote{Except for the rare occasion when it isn't. Those times are fun.} But in real life, you can't unmake a mistake. Sure, you can recover from a mistake, but you are going to have to do some scrambling, my friend, and if you are at least halfway intelligent, you will definitely think twice about trying that again, or at least trying it \textit{that way} again. You don't want to jump through all those hoops again, so you think about your end goal and try to develop a better workflow for next time.
With a GUI, that ``undo'' button is always an option.\footnote{Except for the rare occasion when it isn't. Those times are fun.} But in real life, you can't \textit{unmake} a mistake. Sure, you can recover from a mistake, but you are going to have to do some scrambling, my friend, and if you are at least halfway intelligent, you will definitely think twice about trying that again, or at least trying it \textit{that way} again. You don't want to jump through all those hoops again, so you think about your end goal and try to develop a better workflow for next time.
The command line, in short, makes you think. It makes you plan, it makes you think about the end goal, it makes you remember past failures. The command line makes you think about \textit{outcomes}.
@ -232,7 +233,7 @@ Most people have too many knives, myself included. (Again, this is due to market
\item Cutting meats
\item Peeling fruits and vegetables
\item Cutting fruits and vegetables
\item Cutting cheese\footnote{Yes, I know I said "three or four" and then immediately listed five. Bear with me.}
\item Cutting cheese\footnote{Yes, I know I said ``three or four'' and then immediately listed five. Bear with me.}
\end{itemize}
Sure, there are always those oddball tasks that you have to do once a year or less, like using a butcher's cleaver to torque open a pumpkin, but lets talk about those tasks you do on a weekly basis. So let's talk about the knives I have that will accomplish those tasks:
@ -287,6 +288,8 @@ Device files, such as \verb|/dev/disk0/|, \verb|dev/sda1|, etc. Also the home of
\section{etc}
System-wide static configuration files. It is not allowed to contain binaries.
Some examples include:
\medskip
\noindent \textbf{/etc/opt} — Configuration files for add-on packages stored in \verb|opt|.
@ -356,7 +359,7 @@ The word ``hacker'' has a lot of defitions, and if you just google it, you'll fi
(And yes, there are bad people out there who use their advanced technical knowledge to attain access to systems that they shouldn't have to obtain information they're not supposed to have. I'm not talking about those people, who technically should be called ``crackers'' a l\'{a} ``safe crackers''.)
Rather, I'm talking about the older meaning of the term ``hacker'' which is somebody who enjoys the intellectual challenge of pushing software (and often hardware) beyond what it is meant to do in order to achieve interesting and clever outcomes. In order to do so, of course, they have to know the systems they are working with fairly well. In fact, the definition of 'hack' that I like best is ``an appropriate application of ingenuity.''\footnote{See \href{http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/meaning-of-hack.html}{http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/meaning-of-hack.html}.}
Rather, I'm talking about the older meaning of the term ``hacker'' which is somebody who enjoys the intellectual challenge of pushing software (and often hardware) beyond what it is meant to do in order to achieve interesting and clever outcomes. In order to do so, of course, they have to know the systems they are working with fairly well. In fact, the definition of ``hack'' that I like best is ``an appropriate application of ingenuity.''\footnote{See \href{http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/meaning-of-hack.html}{http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/meaning-of-hack.html}.}
Of course, this term originally referred to computer technology, but now I'm finding that people are using it everywhere, even in places where it doesn't belong. (I'm looking at you, the writers and editors of apparently every food magazine and website ever.)
@ -365,11 +368,11 @@ So let's look at some things that have been called ``hacks'' but may or may not
\begin{enumerate}
\itemsep-0.20em
\item \textbf{How to cut up a mango} — Not a hack. In fact, I'd argue that this is just basic knowledge. Chop up one ripe mango the wrong way and you'll be googling how to do that pretty darn quick.
\item \textbf{Using an ice cube tray to make sushi (in lieu of using a bamboo sushi roller} — While you are using a common device in an uncommon way, I don't think this rises to the level of a hack. There are a lot of ways to put raw fish and rice together.\footnote{Also, be sure to sanitize the hell of that ice cube tray before you use it to make ice again.}
\item \textbf{Using an ice cube tray to make sushi (in lieu of using a bamboo sushi roller)} — While you are using a common device in an uncommon way, I don't think this rises to the level of a hack. There are a lot of ways to put raw fish and rice together.\footnote{Also, be sure to sanitize the hell of that ice cube tray before you use it to make ice again.}
\item \textbf{Making hot chocolate cocoa bombs} — Not a hack. A technique, to be certain, but not a hack.
\item \textbf{Punching holes in your sausage with a toothpick before cooking to keep them from exploding} — A useful tip (especially in the air fryer), but definitely not a hack.
\item \textbf{Use a spiralizer for perfect baked curly fries} — Really? Next we'll have ``Use a hammer to pound nails into wood'' or ``Use a pencil to make marks on paper.'' Using a tool for what it's meant to be used for is not a hack.
\item \textbf{Peel ginger with a spoon} — This is most definitely not what you're supposed to use a spoon for. But this works great. I'll call this one a hack.
\item \textbf{Peel ginger with a spoon} — This is most definitely not what you're supposed to use a spoon for. But this works great. I'll call this one a hack, but just barely. If I used ginger all the time, I'd probably just call this a technique.
\item \textbf{Microwave lemons and limes to get more juice out of them} — A tip, not a hack.
\item \textbf{Freeze cheese to make it easier to grate} — I do this all the time, and it's a great technique. The trick is leave the cheese in the freezer for just the right amount of time. Not a hack.
\item \textbf{Refrigerate onions before chopping them so they don't make you cry} — Chilling the onions makes the volatile sulfur compounds in them less volatile, so this works, provided you chop fast. It's not a hack, but it is a good technique.
@ -381,7 +384,7 @@ So let's look at some things that have been called ``hacks'' but may or may not
\item \textbf{Buy the biggest cutting board you can find.} — While this is great advice, it's not a hack.
\end{enumerate}
So, 15 ``cooking hacks'' and only one of them is an actual hack, and that's pretty questionable. I'm pretty much calling it a hack because I'm trying to be generous. The thing that strikes me is not so much that these aren't actually hacks, but the difference between a ``tip'' and a ``technique.'' Maybe I'm just tired, but it seems like it's a technique if you use it on a regular basis and a tip if you're in a jam and someone tells you about it. But that's an argument for another day in another zine.
So, 15 ``cooking hacks'' and only two of them are an actual hacks, and one of them is pretty questionable. I'm pretty much calling it a hack because I'm trying to be generous. The thing that strikes me is not so much that these aren't actually hacks, but the difference between a ``tip'' and a ``technique.'' Maybe I'm just tired, but it seems like it's a technique if you use it on a regular basis and a tip if you're in a jam and someone tells you about it. But that's an argument for another day in another zine.
\section{What I Learned About \LaTeX\, While Creating This Issue}
@ -412,9 +415,11 @@ As for why I wanted to learn LaTeX in the first place—well, that's complicated
I knew in the back of my mind that there was this great typesetting thing specifically for math and scientific papers, but it took me a while to find it. (This was back in the days before the internet.) But I could recognize just about any paper typeset with it.
Is LaTeX the ideal thing to create zines with? Not necessarily. It does give the finished product a very polished look, and although I love the handmade look (i.e., ``clip and copy'') of a lot of zines, I don't have the talent (or the patience) required to pull that look off. The important thing for me is to be able to create something that is easy on the eyes. (And I've see a lot of handmade zines that \textit{aren't} easy on the eyes.
Is LaTeX the ideal thing to create zines with? Not necessarily. It does give the finished product a very polished look, and although I love the handmade look (i.e., ``clip and copy'') of a lot of zines, I don't have the talent (or the patience) required to pull that look off. The important thing for me is to be able to create something that is easy on the eyes. (And I've see a lot of handmade zines that \textit{aren't} easy on the eyes.)
I've created zines in the past, and I've previously used Adobe InDesign (back in my Macintosh days) and LibreOffice Writer (more recently). They are WYSIWYG\footnote{What You See Is What You Get} programs and it's fairly easy to get what you want (more or less).
I've created zines in the past, and I've previously used Adobe InDesign (back in my Macintosh days) and LibreOffice Writer (more recently). They are WYSIWYG\footnote{What You See Is What You Get} programs and it's fairly easy to get what you want (more or less). (They can be a pain in other ways, however. InDesign used a lot of resources on the little Mac Mini I was using and crashes, while not frequent, were not unknown. LibreOffice has certain interface quirks that I just find frustrating, such as using sections to have different footers or headers. You can't have everything.)
(They can be a pain in other ways, however. InDesign used a lot of resources on the little Mac Mini I was using and crashes, while not frequent, were not unknown. LibreOffice has certain interface quirks that I just find frustrating, such as using sections to have different footers or headers. You can't have everything.)
However, they aren't very amenable to version control, because they don't generate text files, but proprietary files. (I'm not sure about InDesign files, but .odt files are just a collection of \verb|.xml| files and a few others. Change the \verb|.odt| to \verb|.zip| to see them.) While you can track this files in with version control software such as \verb|git|, you can't see the differences between those files by running a simple \verb|git diff|. You have to download the files in question, make sure they have different names so they don't overwrite each other, and check for differences manually.\footnotemark
\footnotetext{As a result, to do version control, I used a version number in the file name and simply did a ``save as'' every time I opened the file for editing, incrementing the version number as I did so.}
@ -423,7 +428,7 @@ With LaTeX however, your \verb|.tex| file really is just a text file, and so if
With LaTeX, it can be difficult to get something to appear exactly where you want it to. Placing objects is actually easiest in InDesign. The main advantage of LaTeX is that it makes it \textit{extremely} easy to make things consistent. I suppose this is something that I will get better at as I gain more experience with it and learn about some more packages.
Also, there is no easy way to get a word-count from a LaTeX document, nor is there a spell-check. Considering that LaTeX was originally constructed for use in academic contexts, I find this strangely lacking. You can get around this by converting it to another file form and counting the words there. I used
Also, there is no easy way to get a word-count from a LaTeX document, nor is there a spell-check. Considering that LaTeX was originally constructed for use in academic contexts, I find this strangely lacking. You can get around this by converting it to another file form and counting the words and running a spell check there. I used
\medskip
@ -435,6 +440,7 @@ Also, there is no easy way to get a word-count from a LaTeX document, nor is the
\noindent to convert this \verb|.tex| document to a LibreOffice document and counted the words there. (It couldn't find the two images I include in this document, but that's okay.) Before I added the last three sentences, I was at 6,515 words. I didn't bother to do a spell-check.
I'm not there yet (and I definitely won't be for a while—I've got bills to pay) but perhaps the nicest thing about LaTeX is that while there are a lot of packages available, if you can't find one to do what you want to do, you can always create your own. Like I said, it will be a while before I get to that point (first I need to find something I want to do in LaTeX that isn't convered by an existing package) but I will someday. Like I said, it's always good to have a challenge to look forward to.
I'm not there yet (and I definitely won't be for a while—I've got bills to pay) but perhaps the nicest thing about LaTeX is that while there are a lot of packages available, if you can't find one to do what you want to do, you can always create your own. It will be a while before I get to that point because first I need to find something I want to do in LaTeX that isn't covered by an existing package, but I someday might. Remember, with the level of control you get with Linux, you also get opportunity. And it's always good to have a challenge to look forward to.
\end{document}
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